Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, NY

Matthew Daneman

(March 30, 2002) 

Printer's ink runs in Bruce R. James' veins, metaphorically speaking.

The Cleveland native bought his first printing press when he was 11, is a 1964 graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology's School of Printing Management and Sciences, and made his fortune in the printing industry.

And on Thursday, the White House announced that President Bush intended to nominate James, who now serves on the RIT board of trustees, to be the nation's public printer.  "He has a varied background that makes him well-qualified to serve in this position," said White House spokesman Ken Lisaius.

As the nation's public printer, James would oversee the U.S. Government Printing Office. It is responsible for printing, binding and distribution of countless federal reports, educational materials and regulations.  You can also thank the office for passports and making sure there are plenty of IRS tax forms available.

James, 59, lives in Nevada with his wife, Nora.  He is former chief executive officer of Barclays Law Publishers, based in Chicago. 

"He is one of the most energetic and one of the most thoughtful and creative trustees we have," said RIT President Albert Simone. James is scheduled to take over as chairman of the RIT board of trustees this fall.

James said the White House contacted him in December about the job, as the Bush administration was looking for a Republican nominee with extensive printing industry experience. James is active in the Nevada Republican Party and was briefly a GOP candidate for Senate in Nevada in 1998.

The Government Printing Office already employs a number of RIT graduates, James said, adding that he planned to look for ways "to enhance the relationship."

Simone said he hoped to build a "partnership" relationship with the Government Printing Office like the ones RIT has with printing industry bigwigs such as Xerox Corp. and Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG.

For more on the U.S. Government Printing Office: www.gpo.gov.

Copyright 2002 Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.